ValhallaRoom updated to version 1.0.4

I’ve just released the 1.0.4 update of ValhallaRoom:

A brief overview of the updates:

  • Windows RTAS! ValhallaRoom is now available in all major formats for PC (VST32/VST64/RTAS) and OSX (AU/AU64/VST/RTAS).
  • Mix lock functionality. The red “MIX” label above the Mix slider is clickable. Clicking on the Mix label allows the user to lock/unlock the Mix value, so that a given mix level can be retained while browsing through presets.
  • The red triangles to the right of the current preset (“BasilicaOfSanPetronio” in the image above) allow the user to quickly scroll through presets.
  • I’ve created some new Cathedral presets, based on acoustic measurements of Italian cathedrals (and one German cathedral).

ValhallaRoom Released for Windows (32/64-bit VST)

I am happy to announce that the 32-bit and 64-bit VSTs of ValhallaRoom have just been released for Windows. Check out the demo at

http://www.valhalladsp.com/valhallaroom

Thanks to my beta testers for helping me sort out installer issues and the like.

ValhallaShimmer released for Windows RTAS

I just released the Windows RTAS version of ValhallaShimmer. Set your browsers to

http://www.valhalladsp.com/shimmer.html

and check it out. Demo versions available at that link.

To sum up (as there has been several updates in the last few days): ValhallaShimmer is now released for:

OSX VST
OSX Audio Unit (32-bits)
OSX Audio Unit (64-bits)
OSX RTAS

Windows VST (32-bit)
Windows VST (64-bit)
Windows RTAS

I’m going to go out and enjoy the snow with the kids for the rest of the day (it’s snowing here in Seattle, which doesn’t happen in November that much). After that, I will put up a few blog entries about ValhallaShimmer, explaining the history of it, how it works, tips and tricks, that sort of thing. I also have a few generic topics that I want to cover, although coding has taken priority over happy creative thoughts for the past several months.

ValhallaShimmer now available for Windows VST

I just posted ValhallaShimmer for Windows VST. A demo version is available, which mutes the sound every 45 seconds (just like the OSX versions), but is in all other aspects identical to the full version. Check it out at

http://www.valhalladsp.com/shimmer.html

Thanks to everyone who has bought ValhallaShimmer so far. I appreciate your support.

ValhallaShimmer, Meet Korg Monotron. Korg Monotron, Meet ValhallaShimmer.

My old friend David Hopper gave me a Korg Monotron yesterday. I’ve had an insane amount of fun getting R2D2 noises, FM drones, and rhythmic beats out of this little battery operated analog synth.

Today, I recorded a few short Monotron drones through ValhallaShimmer. I’m using 4 series instances of Shimmer, with 2 of the instances pitch shifting the feedback by +/- 12 semitones and +/- semitones. Here’s what came out:

For reference, here is the original Monotron track with no instances of ValhallaShimmer enabled:

ValhallaShimmer was designed to create a huge amount of sonic complexity out of any sound source. By using a simple sound source such as the Monotron and controlling only a few parameters (Pitch, VCF Cutoff, VCF Peak), you can make big sounds that are responsive to subtle sonic gestures.

In other ValhallaShimmer news, I ported the plugin to Windows VST and RTAS late last week. I need to add some optimizations to the Windows code, but this should allow me to release the Windows and OS X versions of the plugin at the same time. (UPDATE: Windows VST, and OSX VST/AU/RTAS released. Go to http://www.valhalladsp.com/shimmer.html to get yourself a copy.)

ValhallaFreqEcho MkI Released: GUI. Tempo Delay. VST/AU/RTAS. Mac/Windows. Free.

I am pleased to announce the MkI release of ValhallaFreqEcho:

The plugin now features a custom GUI, as seen above. I have added the ability to sync the delay time to tempo. ValhallaFreqEcho MkI is available for Windows and Mac, in VST, AU, and RTAS formats.

ValhallaFreqEcho MkI has been under development for quite some time, and I am rather proud of the results. I invite you to download it and check it out. Keep checking this blog in the next few days for tutorials, tips and tricks, and a bunch of theoretical musings.